International Journal of Management, Accounting and Economics
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Volume 6, No. 12, December 2019 Pages: 844 - 861
Disclosure, Accountability and Performance: The Case of Ghanaian Banking Industry
Alex Antwi-Adjei, Kong Yusheng, Samuel Asubonteng , Kong Yusheng , Samuel Asubonteng
Corresponding author:
alexantwiadjei[at]yahoo[dot]com
Abstract:
Emerging post-financial crisis research in Africa recently suggest a strong linkage between poor corporate governance and the non-transparency in the financial institutions involved, leading to loss of investor confidence and other ramifying effects. This has reignited the need to progressively re-examine or rethink the gaps in existing financial regulatory framework in accordance with acceptable corporate governance standards. Our study reviewed and tested the influence of four voluntary disclosure attributes namely; a percentage of family members on boards, extant of independent committee of audit, existence of more important personalities and the proportion of non-dependent directors of CG, as promulgated by the Bank of Ghana. An adjusted relative disclosure was used in this study. We noted the prevalence of a committee of auditors is positively and significantly connected to a degree of deliberate disclosure, whereas, a higher number of family members on the board attenuates effective voluntary disclosure. The outcomes give empirical proof to back Ghana’s financial regulatory authorities.
Keywords:
Disclosure, Accountability, Performance, Financial Sector
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